The Catacombs Catacombs Reference Library
Space 1999 review, September 1975

Short review from September 1975 in a UK tabloid newspaper (probably Saturday 6th September 1975)

Space 1999 5.50-6.45 ATV to LWT.

Lew Grade's bet is that this one will still be around in 1999 - and with its impressive array of special effects and audio-visual fireworks (by Brian Johnson who did 2001) and the timeless banality of its characters and storylines, that shrewd old showman seems set for a winner. This latest piece of sci-fi nonsense is from the Anderson stable, carefully packaged and guaranteed free from seditious ideas to contaminate youthful minds. The wooden performers of their earlier successes like Thunderbirds and Joe 90 are here replaced by their live counterparts. A multiracial crew of Terrans (led by Martin Landau, Barbara Bain and Barry Morse) find themselves blasted into deep space when their Moon base is pushed out of Earth's orbit by atomic explosions. The series thus set for an endless run through the gamut of science fiction cliches dear to the hearts of its fans. Unfortunately for Londoners it clashes with Dr Who but If you miss it this time round, you can see it again ... and again ... and again ...

Wendy McFadden


Daily Mirror, Thursday, 4th September 1975

An expensive space spectacular blasts off tonight.

Sir Lew Grade spent more than £2,500,000 on the new science fiction series SPACE 1999 (I.T.V., most regions 7.0; London on Saturday).

The drama centres on Moonbase Alpha which, with a population of several hundred, is in danger of being blown apart.

The Moon has been used for dumping atomic waste.

Amid all the excitement we meet Moonbase commander John Koenig (Martin Landau), Dr. Helena Russell (Barbara Bain) and Professor Bergman (Barry Morse).

There is a lot of technical Space talk and in spite of the awful danger, no one can be blamed for feeling a sense of tedium.

The characters are a serious-minded bunch and in the first story, "Breakaway", show less individuality than the puppet characters in "Thunderbirds", created by the same producers, Sylvia and Gerry Anderson.

MIRROR VERDICT: Too much gravity, but the series should get into orbit.